Women's Ride Mission

                               We welcome any and all female-identifying, transgender, and gender non-conforming cyclists and endeavor to:

1. Provide a safe, supportive space for those who have been underserved in the cycling community to develop their skills without judgement.
2. Encourage diversity and inclusivity within the WRCC and the surrounding cycling community.
3. Cater to a majority of skill levels in order to promote growth as cyclists learn to safely ride with others.
4. Empower cyclists in their abilities and knowledge of the sport and their equipment.

Ride Information:

Tuesdays at 6 pm from May 21st through September 10th

All three groups leave from Celery Bog Nature Area, 1620 Lindberg Rd, West Lafayette, IN, at 6:00pm, and we return at the same location often meeting at a local establishment nearby for some additional comradery and sustenance after our respective rides in an outdoor setting. 

For more information on the expected pace for WRCC rides, please visit WRCC Speed Categories

In addition to the above guide, we like to associate our categories with skill levels for those who are not sure what pace they can sustain. We encourage new riders or cyclists that have never ridden in a group to join the E/F ride to start. This ride provides the fundamentals about communication and ride etiquette expected on all rides. 

For more information on the skill levels we encourage and expect for each ride category, please see HERE TBD.

History

                                                     

The Wabash River Cycling Club Women’s Ride began in 2016 as an idea between Laura Furey and Pat Boling to “just get more women out riding” in the community. Tuesday night rides starting from Hodson’s Bay Company evolved into the ride of today which requires not just one, but four, ride leaders to meet the demands of the women and gender minorities in our community. 

Over the years this ride has grown into a contingency of strong and independent cyclists who attend our rides for a variety of reasons. Some join for companionship, some for the challenge, and others for building confidence in a judgement-free environment. Despite their original motivation for coming out to ride, they all leave with a renewed sense of community and solidarity.